Below is a sample unit on Audience and proposed lesson plan.


Audience Unit

Course: ENGL 1101

Unit Name: Understanding Audience

Major In-Class Learning Activities
Week One
(Intro)
Before Class: Reading “Appealing to Audience” section in Everything is an Argument
In Class: Discussion of audience and how to identify an audience.
Homework: Select a movie trailer on YouTube, identify the rating, audience, and how they appeal to that audience.
Week Two
(Application)
Before Class: Flip-Class Presentation on Writing for Audience.
In Class: Practice writing for different audiences (personal, professional, educational, etc.)
Homework: Identify your audience for your Literacy Narrative, brainstorm how you can appeal to that audience.
Week Three
(Review)
Before Class: Complete your Literacy Narrative rough drafts.
In Class: Peer Review Day. Part of the peer review will include identifying how the intended audience is appealed to or if it is unclear.
Homework: Revise rough draft based on feedback.
Week Four
(Reflection)
Before Class: Revise your Literacy Narrative for final submission.
In Class: Turn in final drafts and complete a self reflection paper. The audience of the self-reflection is yourself. Part of the self-reflection will be identifying applying the skills they have learned in class, including audience, in this paper.
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Lesson Plan

Lesson: Introduction to Audience

Central Focus: One of the biggest components of any form of writing is knowing your audience. We are always, always writing for a specific audience, whether that audience is ourselves, our peers or friends, our boss, our ENGL 1101 professor, our parents, and so on. Being cognizant of your audience helps you establish appropriate tone, word choice, style, and so on. In this lesson, we will be examining what it means to identify and appeal to your audience, using movie trailers – which clearly identify their audience at the beginning of the trailer (rating) as an example.

Student Learning Goal(s)/Objective(s): The objective of this lesson is to have students begin identifying audience in other forms of writing outside of formal papers – movie trailers, personal writing, e-mails, social media, etc. The goal is that if they can begin to be cognizant of audience outside of school writing, they will be better able to identify audience in school as well. The goal is also to help them understand that their audience for school papers isn’t always a formal English professor who expects Standard English and perfect grammar. Understanding who your professor is and what specific things they are looking for is a big part of audience.

The objective of this lesson is to have students begin identifying audience in other forms of writing outside of formal papers – movie trailers, personal writing, e-mails, social media, etc. The goal is that if they can begin to be cognizant of audience outside of school writing, they will be better able to identify audience in school as well. The goal is also to help them understand that their audience for school papers isn’t always a formal English professor who expects Standard English and perfect grammar. Understanding who your professor is and what specific things they are looking for is a big part of audience.

Prior Academic Knowledge and Conceptions: Students will need to have completed the short reading in Everything is an Argument on audience. There may also be a brief prewriting activity to go along with the reading.

Common Errors, Developmental Approximations, Misconceptions, Partial Understands or Misunderstandings: Many students will have a preconceived notion that, when writing papers in school, perfect grammar and punctuation are the expectation. They have most likely had these ideas, as well as the idea of a five paragraph essay, no contractions, no personal pronouns, and other such “rules” drilled into their heads, giving them the misconception that their intended audience is always a teacher who will copy edit for grammar mistakes.


Launch: 5 Minutes
We will start class with a brief review of what was in the textbook about audience, as well as a brainstorm of who they think their intended audience will be for their Literacy Narrative.

Instruction: 10 Minutes
We will review different kinds of audience, both in school and outside of school. We will start with the easier to identify audience, like a work e-mail or a grocery list, and talk about how they might write these two things differently. Then, we will build off of that and go into broader or not as easily identified audiences, like school papers, social media, etc.

Structured Practice and Application: 25 Minutes
Students will be broken into groups and given a prompt, including things like “You need to request the day off of work, even though it is your company’s busiest season” or “You need to request an extension on your paper because you overslept. It’s due today.” Students will be asked to identify their audience, the method they would present their prompt (e-mail, written note, etc.) and how they might appeal to that specific audience. They will come back together and discuss their ideas as a class.

Closure: 10 Minutes
We will close class with a final discussion of audience, open for questions, and discuss the homework assignment of selecting a movie trailer.


Student Interactions:
Students will be working in small groups to identify the audience and how to appeal to said audience in tricky situations. They will have the opportunity to share their ideas with the class, and ask questions throughout the lesson.

What If’s:
If students are struggling to identify the audiences in the instruction portion of the class, or it seems like they could use more examples, I may invert the group work and homework. We can show movie trailers in class (I will have some pre-selected that demonstrate audience appeal well) and be prepared to use those in class and discuss. The students will then have the group work for homework, which can be completed in a discussion post or collaborative document.

Materials:
Everything is an Argument and movie trailers if needed. We will mostly be brainstorming audiences and appeals on the whiteboard during class.

Assessments:
The assessment will be informal and dependent on students’ understanding of audience in class based on discussion and response. This will be a daily participation grade in which students will be expected to engage, respond, and collaborate with each other.



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